barry-burnsTrading legend, Barry Burns, hails from Los Angeles and has been trading stocks, futures, e-minis, Forex, commodities and options for over 30 years.

Barry is the author of “Trend Trading For Dummies,” and a contributing author to “Using Candlestick Charting” and “The Complete Guide to Investing in Derivatives.” He has also provided training for organizations such as the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, the Eurex Exchange, Trader Kingdom, NinjaTrader, Reuters MetaStock and many others.

These days Barry runs his own firm, Top Dog Trading, and focuses on teaching people how to become profitable traders, while at the same time day trading and swing trading his own account.

In the show Barry shares with us:

  • What he does to “tame” the market
  • How he uses the 5 energies that move the markets
  • The different reward to risk ratio’s he targets
  • His “Reload” trading strategy

Interview

13: Barry Burns on the 5 Trading Energies that make him a Top Dog Trader
00:00:00 00:00:00

Recommended book

Market Wizards by Jack Swagger

Trading style

Technical Analysis, Day trader, Swing trader

Platform & Broker

Ninja Trader for both

Interview links

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Transcript highlights

Cam Hawkins:

Barry, tell us a bit about yourself, personally, and what first attracted you to trading?

Barry Burns:

Well, personally, let’s see. I’m married, I have two wonderful daughters. As you said, I live here in beautiful la la land, Los Angeles, California. I live in a castle actually. If you can imagine a mid-evil castle in Los Angeles. Well, there is one and I live in it. It’s a very unique environment, we’ve got a lot of privacy here and it’s just a beautiful oasis but we’re still right in the middle of all the action and cultural things here. I’ve been doing martial arts all of my life. I started with fencing actually and went to the junior Olympics and won a silver medal there. But then I got inspired by Bruce Lee and since I was 14 I’ve been doing a lot of other types of martial arts and now I’m 56 years old I started doing Craft Maga, an Israeli combat art. They don’t really like to call it a martial art. I’m just loving it being 56 and in there with all these 20 and 30 year olds kicking butt and getting my butt kicked. It’s very invigorating and an amazing workout.

As far as trading goes, I got started because my dad was a trader. Now, it wasn’t his primary occupation, it was his avocation, his passion in life. But he was so passionate about it that he talked about it all the time. So, I really didn’t have much choice about learning trading. By osmosis it soaked into my brain cells and into the pours of my skin. He waited until I was at the ripe age of 8 to start formally teaching me and like I said, he trades stocks, so I started out trading stocks. He’s sit me down and I’d pull out 5 research portfolio’s he had put together of 5 different and just lay them in front of me. He didn’t really teach, he just kind of said, here’s the information and again, I’m 8, and we’re sitting at the dining room table. He’d say “Pick the next one that we should buy”. I didn’t even know what I was looking at really, but I looked through it and I’d say “I don’t know what I’m looking at” and he’d say “That’s alright, just do the best you can”. So, I just kind of failed forward and I’m sure… I never asked my dad this; he’s passed away God bless his sole. I’m sure he must have filtered out some good candidates beforehand because he always brought whatever I said we should buy. And then we would watch. So he’d give me the experience of watching the market when you had money on the line. Which obviously, incorporates the emotional component. So, that’s how I started learning. I made some good money and it helped me get through college. Then I got away from it and focused on other things. Eventually I got disillusioned with corporate America and all he other ways of making money out there. And so I called my dad up and went back to Detroit where I was raised and so was he. I said “Dad, I want you to re-mentor me”. And as I looked at all the ways of earning a living I felt that trading was the best because it gave me time freedom, I could make money when I wanted, I could go on vacations, I could work from home and that lifestyle was very important to me. The other thing that was important was, I didn’t want to have a cap to my income. I always felt very confident that I could make millions of dollars. With trading, with leverage, I’ve never been afraid of leverage for some reason, and with that it could be a recipe for disaster, but fortunately it’s never gotten me in trouble either.  But I respect leverage and use it to make very large amounts of money, obviously.

So, I got involved in futures after tutoring with my dad again. I aligned myself with some other mentors, some local, some in Chicago, some all over the country. And I learned all different things. I learned about Futures. I learned about Futures after Stocks, because I really loved the leverage. Then one of my mentors said, “Barry you really need to look at the Euro” and that was well before the Spot Forex market was popular here in the US. So I started trading that with him. I eventually got into Commodities and learned Options. That was the last market I learned and I delved deeply into that. So, that’s an overview of my journey.

Cam Hawkins:

Can you give the listeners some insight into your trading? Your trading style, strategy, time frames, ave. trade duration, % winner’s, typical risk reward ratio… those sorts of things.

Barry Burns: 

It’s really evolved over time. What I do now is, I really love day trading. Even after all these decades, I still love trading. Just like my dad. I’m really passionate about it.

What I do is, I get up every morning, well, not really. I get up when I get up. That’s one of the nice things. Back in the days of yore, when I was coming up through the ranks I use to trade for 13 hours a day and that got to be old after a while, but it was a great learning experience. I’d get up about midnight California time and start trading the DAX and I like trading the DAX, it’s a nice market. You can make good money with that. Then I would trade the Euro a few hours later. Then I would go to the Eminis, commodities, gold, bonds, crude and that what I basically do with my day trading now. I like to trade Futures in these various markets that are not necessarily correlated all the time and I don’t have a favourite market. My favourite market is – whatever is moving now. So, I’ve got 7 monitors and I have all the different charts up, so I’m just looking for wherever the opportunity is this day, this hour. Some days a particular market will just be flat, no volatility, just moving sideways, nothing happening. I’m not going to trade that market. It doesn’t matter, I don’t care. The S&P’s not moving that day, maybe gold is, maybe bonds are, maybe crude is or maybe the Euro is. Something is always moving. They say there’s always  a raging bull market somewhere, there’s always a raging bear market somewhere. And I don’t even need that. I just need an opportunity. I have certain strategies that I trade. Setups. And I wait for the market to come to me. I know these strategies are high probability because I’ve been trading them a long, long time. I don’t chase the market because to me the market is like a wild beast. An untamed beast. I will never be tamed. I feel like I will never master the market. I’m not trying to. I let the wild beast do whatever it’s going to do, but every once in a while it gets tired and it decides to co-operate. But never think that they’ll ever be tamed. They won’t. So I look at these various, non-correlated markets and wait for them to create one of my setups for me based on 5 energies. I’ll just outline them very quick. Trend, for direction. That helps me decide which side of the market I want to be on. That’s the first thing I look at. Then Momentum. That tells me the strength of that trend. Then Cycles, which is timing. Number 4 is support and resistance, which is a blockage of the first 3 energies. And then is what I call the Energy of Scale which simply means using more than one timeframe of the same market. So, looking that the same market on a different scale. Essentially, all I’m doing is waiting for those 5 energies to align because these 5 energies are uncorrelated to the other 4. So, when they all align, then we have a significant probability scenario. And that’s what I’m doing, I’m just waiting for that. I use very common indicators, but I’ve customised them a little bit, I’ve colour coded them so that when they align I can see they’re all green for bullish or all red for bearish. And, I take a trade, I know exactly where my entry is, I know exactly where my stop goes, I know where my targets are. Everything is very rule base and objective. And I go.

Cam Hawkins:

What’s your typical risk to reward ratio?

Barry Burns: 

I love that question. It depends on the setup. If it’s a trend trade. Where I’m trading with the trend. So even though I use the energy of the trend it doesn’t always mean I trade with the trend. I’ll trade with it if it’s early in the trend but I will fade the trend if it’s late in the trend. So if I get in, as early as I can, my first signal in the trend. I’m looking for, generally, about a 3:1, 5:1 reward to risk ratio. I don’t go in with an expectancy of what that ratio will but I generally know that’s what I’ll be looking for. Trend trades have a favourable reward to risk ratio. But I’ve got to keep my mind clear and not get set on these expectations; otherwise I’m not going to be following what’s going on in real life with the market. My hope will guide my exits more than the market. I want to have the market guide my exists. So, for example, a trend may start but may not follow through. It may not be a long trend, it may be very very short. Other times it may be longer than usual. So I’m constantly monitoring the market. I call it trading bar by bar. I’m watching what’s happening and adjusting my exit strategy accordingly. The best reward/risk trade is a reversal trade. Where I get in at the very end of one trend and the market starts a new trend in the opposite direction. So that has the best reward to risk ratio. That can be 5:1, to up to 20:1. Those are fabulous, but there seems to be an inverse relationship between win loss ratio and reward to risk ratio. So, reversal trades are not a high win/loss ratio trade, they’re challenging. But you can still make money with them. I call these, making money on failed trades. Meaning that the setup doesn’t do exactly what we wanted. So, for example on this one, just because the market stops trending, does not mean it’s going to go into a down trend. So we may have caught the end of that trend, sometimes we will, sometimes we won’t, sometimes we’ll have to take a couple of shots at it. That’s okay because the way we manage our money and manage our exists, we can still get a breakeven trade out of it and get a couple of shots. But, if the trend does end, and for example, let’s say it’s a bull trend and we get the very, very top of it and we short it. The reason we’re taking that trade is to then catch a new downtrend before it’s confirmed. However, not every end in a trend results in a trend in the opposite direction. It may just go into consolidation. And if it does, that’s fine with me because I’ll just make a smaller amount of money.

I have certain trades that are just scalp trades which are a 1:1 reward/risk ratio but the win/loss on them is about 90%. So, it’s easier to anticipate the movement of the market for the short term as it is with the long term. So, everything looks good by the time you get in, but after you get in who knows, maybe the market sentiment changes a little bit over the hour, maybe some unexpected news, or even just a rumour. Markets are very fickle.

Cam Hawkins:

How many active trades do you have at one time?

Barry Burns:

Normally, just one if I’m day trading. I’ll do as many as two.

Cam Hawkins:

What would be your average trade length?

Barry Burns:

Anywhere from maybe, two to 10 minutes.

Cam Hawkins: 

What does your typical trading day look like?

Barry Burns:

If you’re day trading, I think a lot of day traders get up and just kind of get up a grab a coffee, maybe do some research. I don’t do any research by the way. The only thing I’ll do as far as research goes is check the economic calendar for that day. But what I do is I get up just like I’m going to work. So, I’ll have a nice healthy breakfast, have a shower, get dressed nicely, do exercise and Tai Chi. So by the time I’m ready to trade I’m in optimal mental and physical condition.

A big part of trading, I think, is managing yourself.

Cam Hawkins:

In the beginning, what differentiated you from the average Ma or Pa trader out there? What traits did you have, what actions did you take?

Barry Burns: 

I was talking with a friend and he’s a multi-millionaire as well and he said he gets asked that question all the time and I said “Yeah, how do you answer that one?” He said it’s a tough one because people are expecting some sort of magic wand or interesting insight and he said, “It’s just a lot of hard work”. And I was “Yeah that’s pretty much it too” it’s not really anything interesting it’s just I think I have more persistence, maybe more patience, my work ethics are off the charts and that is inspired though, by my passion for trading. It was just never an option to not succeed. And so I would just keep going and I enjoyed the learning process. There were times where I would get frustrated and things didn’t work out, or I’d wake up and a stock went down 50% overnight. I would just say, work ethic, persistence, never giving up, and another thing I’d add is being smart about it. I think a lot of people jump in with too much money too soon and that’s just a recipe for disaster and I would say it takes about 4 years to learn to become a professional trader. That’s what it took me. It’s really like a college education. So take it slow, get a great education, trade on a demo account, trade with a little bit of money so that you’re not putting too much emotion into the market. That changes the way you behave. And I did that, that’s the recipe I followed and I was patient, I wasn’t too anxious to become a millionaire overnight.  I guess, maybe with my dad I already had some pretty realistic expectations. My dad was super conservative in that way as well.

Cam Hawkins:

If you were a retail trader working a day job, what 3 steps would you take to start earning an income as a trader?

Barry Burns:

I never had to do that, but I guess if I did I would probably swing trade. Meaning I would trade daily charts and trade stocks and Exchange Traded Funds, things like that. On a daily chart, where I wouldn’t have to be watching it intra day. Even today when I swing trade. After the market closes and I’m done with my work after trading which is a little process I have to do, then I’ll take a break and I’ll come back and look at my swing trading positions. And I place buy stops where I want to get in and the next day, I’ll put those into the market with my broker, they’ll either get filled or they don’t. But I never have to look at the market live with those swing trades. The other thing is I like to trade Options on that because I like the flexibility with Options. The other thing, depending on where the person lives, if the market is open during their work hours then go to something like Spot Forex that trades 247 and follow the sun around the world. And trade the currency that’s available when you’re available.

Cam Hawkins: 

Can you explain to the listeners your preferred trading strategy, the ins and outs of how it works and why you choose this type of strategy over others?

Barry Burns:

I’ll share a couple of specific strategies. These are both based on what I call the reload pattern. The simplest one to understand is when we have an uptrend. I look for that uptrend in price. It’s especially good if it’s early in the trend. Then I look at momentum. I’m really big into momentum. I think a lot of people underestimate how important momentum is. Now, what’s interested is because these energies are non-correlated, you’ll see times when price it trending up and momentum is actually trending down. Some people have a hard time understanding, how can that be? Well, it is, it does happen. This is actually an opportunity. I call it the reload pattern. You’re familiar I’m sure with how people measure waves on price. I do that too. I don’t use Elliott Wave, I use a more objective wave measure. But I also count waves on momentum. And that I think is fairly unique. I’ve never seen anyone else do that. So, what I’ll do is look for a price trending up and a 5 wave down pattern on momentum. What happens is, that energy of momentum will then release back to the upside. Five waves is an extended momentum duration. The average momentum wave it 3, the average trend wave on price is 5. So they have different averages. I look for an extended downward trend in momentum and then I trade that back in the direction of the price trend which is up. That is a really really powerful trade. Very high win/loss ratio and depending on the timing of the price trend it can be a good reward/risk ratio as well.

The other one that I like, and this works especially well with equities and equity futures. I like to trade this on the Eminis actually. I’ll watch the up down volume index and my trading is going to be in the direction of that trend. It measures the difference between the up volume and the down volume. It’s actually an index, it’s not an indicator. So, let’s say it’s up today and I’ll also look at the advanced decline line. Again it’s a similar thing. Let’s say Volume is up and Advanced Decline is going down (is trending down for the moment). I’ll draw a trendline on that and I’ll wait for the trendline to be broken back into the direction of the up down volume and I’ll take that long. As that’s the dominant energy, the up down energy.

Cam Hawkins: 

If you split your trading up into technical vs fundamental, what would that split look like?

Barry Burns:

I’m a technical trader. My dad did a lot with fundamentals and I really got away from that. He didn’t do much with technicals, but I’ve come to rely on it pretty much 100%. The only thing I do now with fundamentals is watch the economic reports which are announced. Also the calendar is very important, everybody is watching that and when those news items are release people are going to respond to them one way or another.

To me fundamentals are lagging. Techncial’s are not necessarily leading, but it is what is. People interpret the fundamentals to trade them and I think it’s very hard to interpret what other people are going to do. Plus, the Dow Theory of discounting the market. Professionals are always doing things ahead and by the time the news is released then it’s over, the deal is done. They’re onto another market. It’s just like they say “Buy the rumor and sell the news”.

Cam Hawkins: 

Diving a little deeper, thinking about any price chart, what 3 things would you recommend a novice or intermediate trader educate themselves on when reading a chart?

Barry Burns:

I’m going to focus on 3 that I find people not focusing on so much. Number 1, would be timing. Learn about cycles in the market. It’s interesting. I don’t see as many people focusing on timing with their technical analysis as they should. Timing is very important. A chart is a 2 dimensional object. On the right we’ve got price and on the bottom axis we have time. So there’s only 2 dimensions on a chart and yet most people only focus on price or derivatives of price. And they don’t know how to determine timing for their entries and their exists. They don’t have any kind of timing tool and they don’t become skilled at using that tool. So, then they’re missing out on 50% of the information on a chart. And trading is all about creating probability scenarios. So how can this be established when you ignore 50% of the information. So learn about cycles.

Number 2, I’m coming back to momentum. Trend traders, a lot of them, even the good ones, they make money, but their win/loss ratio is not that good. They make up for it in their reward/risk ratio. If you learn about momentum, oh my gosh, that changed my trading forever, and that’s the strength of a market; and again I’ll trade the trend when it’s strong, but there are other types of trades that are just pure momentum plays.

And then the third one I would say would be a combination of those two. Timing, using cycles with momentum. I call this ex-con trading. It stands for Expansion Contraction. I certainly didn’t invent this approach but I love trading contracting markets. Low volatility markets. And this could be Bollinger Bands, tweezers, it could be triangles, wedges. These kinds of things. And then, I like trading the breakout because this is another cycle actually. After contraction, lower volatility, we are going to get “boom” expansion. And those are fun trades, because when we get that expansion the market moves in a pretty good range, pretty fast and that means good money real fast and that’s what it some fun. So I would encourage people to learn about that type of trading as well.

Cam Hawkins: 

How long did it take you to go from trading newbie to consistently profitable trader?

Barry Burns:

About 4 years.

Cam Hawkins: 

What’s your mental approach to trading and what special techniques do you use to keep your emotions in check?

Barry Burns:

The primary way I’ve learned to do that is through a series of stops. So, for each trade I have a protective stop. For each day, I have a protective stop. Meaning I’ll only allow myself to lose a certain percentage of my account on a given day. If I hit that threshold I’m done for the day and I literally have to turn off my computers. I don’t even look at the market. I also have a money protective stop for the week, for the month, quarter and year. That way I know I’m not going to blow up my account. I also know I’m not going to get over the threshold of pain for my own mind (what I can withstand mentally).

Cam Hawkins: 

What’s your favourite entry setup?

Barry Burns:

Going back to the 5 energy method. Looking for trend, momentum, cycle, support, resistance and the fractal or energy of scale; all line up being bullish or bearish at the exact same moment.

Cam Hawkins:

What strategies do you use to exit and manage active trades?

Barry Burns:

I get out on 3 different occasions. My first 2 are just pure profit targets. The third one is a trailing stop.

Cam Hawkins: 

What’s your recommended “must read” trading book?

Barry Burns:

There are so many good ones but I’d probably put at the top of my list: Market Wizards by Jack Swagger I believe. I like that one because it gives people a realistic view of trading.

Cam Hawkins:

Do you automate parts of your trading? If so, what have you automated, why and how does it help you?

Barry Burns:

I haven’t really automated the trading as far as entering the market and exiting the market. What I have done is, I’ve taken some very common indicators and I’ve customized them a little bit to (for example I’ve talked about wave count) so I’ve got it so it counts waves on price; it counts waves on momentum and it colour codes things in green and red so I know if it’s bullish or bearish. It just allows me to look at a chart and instantly see the setup.

Cam Hawkins: 

If there was one thing you would recommend any retail trader spend the next month mastering, what would it be, why and how could they go about mastering it?

Barry Burns:

You would have to master yourself. That’s one of the things I like about trading. Trading is ultimately about self-mastery. I think, really because being successful at anything is ultimately about self-mastery. Now, the follow up question you ask is really the key. How do you go about doing that? That’s a very insightful thing to ask. The way I teach my students to do it, the way I did it was, we use trading logs but not just like any other trading logs. The thing we put on our trading logs in addition to entries and exits is how we felt when we took the trade, what we were thinking when we took the trade. That’s kind of a bio feedback. I can look back over all my trades and look for patterns. How my brain responded to certain trades and setups. Also we list any mistakes that we took. We have a list of common mistakes that traders make. Any mistake we make on any trade, we list it there. We then move that over to a weekly log where we start to chart these things so that we can start to see patterns. Then we print out our charts. One of my mentors told me to print out my charts and to not just review them on the screen. Believe it or not, that makes a huge difference. I didn’t believe it myself until I did it. You look for patterns on what you’re thinking, feeling and also the mistakes you make. That trading log then becomes like a mirror of self-revelation. You start to see things that you had a vague awareness of about yourself, but when you see it in black and white all of a sudden you realise those patterns and how they are hurting you. Then at that point, trading becomes a game of not making mistakes anymore. One last thing, we keep two columns. One column is how much money we made or lost, the other column is how much money we would have made or lost if we didn’t make any mistakes. Inevitably people are very close to breaking even or profitable traders if they didn’t make those mistakes. And that’s what provides the motivation to change the behaviour.

Cam Hawkins:

What trading related internet resource, like bloomberg.com, do you always use?

Barry Burns:

I use the Barron’s economic calendar and I also like MyPivots.com. I use a little bit of market profile. I especially put the area of high or low on the charts and I find that to be very very powerful. I get those levels from MyPivots.com.

Cam Hawkins: 

What’s the biggest mistake most retail traders make?

Barry Burns:

One I already mentioned is that they don’t master themselves, they focus too much on indicators and moving averages and all the stuff. And that stuff has its place, but they don’t understand that the key to success is managing themselves. The other thing is, focus on managing risk. Let the winners take care of themselves. They will if you have a good profitable trading methodology. But, boy, markets are always risky, even for professional traders. We know it’s always risky. Back in the days of Jesse Livermore, they use to call it speculation, I still like that term. I like to call it speculation, because it reminds me that all of this is speculative and it’s always risky no matter how good you are.

Cam Hawkins: 

What’s your preferred broker and trading platform?

Barry Burns:

My favourite is Ninja Trader, I use that. That’s what I had my indicators created for. Also, MT4 (Metatrader 4) and for Tradestation.

I have a lot of different brokerage accounts and use different brokers for different things. Interactive Brokers I use for Options, but Ninja Trader overall for both broker and charting platform.

Cam Hawkins: 

If there was one mantra or saying our listeners should reminded themselves of each day, to help improve their trading, what would it be?

Barry Burns:

“The market can do anything at any time”. In fact, that is so profound and important that I recommend everybody put that on a post it note and put it right on your monitor so you see it every single day. To remind you of how risky trading is and to trade bar by bar, because truly the market can do anything at any time.

Cam Hawkins: 

If you could leave our listeners with one piece of advice what would it be?

Barry Burns:

Find out what your trading mistakes are. By the way, I have a list of top ten trading mistakes that I’ve compiled with my students over time and I’ll be happy to share that list with anybody. And I’m happy to share my trading logs with people too. Absolutely free.

People make the same mistakes over and over again and they do it sub consciously. They have some awareness, but they really don’t understand how many times they are doing the wrong thing. I don’t think you 100% eliminate mistakes. I still make mistakes from time to time. But I’ve dramatically reduced the number of mistakes I make and I rarely make the ones I had as my most common mistakes. Those are the killers.

Cam Hawkins: 

Perfect! For those not in the know, my mastermind community are working towards creating a profitable trading system. If you’re not in the mastermind yet, just jump on 52traders.com and join today while it’s free.

So, Barry, today your task is this:

We’d like you to help us find a high probability exit point for our trading system. We already have a market to focus on (namely the S&P500), and we’re looking for specific standard indicators, candlestick formations, market events, those sorts of things…

So Barry, to help us pinpoint high probability exit points for our trading system what “3 golden nuggets” can you share with us today?

Barry Burns:

Ok. That’s easy because I do this every day. What I do is I look for the confluence of 3 things and it really goes back to my five energies. Let’s say that we’re long just to setup and example here. I’d be looking at resistance levels (that’s be the first thing). Primarily I’m looking for previous significant highs and lows. I also look at Fibonacci’s. If I’m day trading I’ll look at floor trader pivots. The common suspects, I don’t have any unique support/resistance levels that I use. And as we all know, not all resistance levels will hold. Sometimes the market goes shooting through resistance levels; sometimes it bounces off of them. I’m watching those, and my question is which one of those resistance levels will hold. So then I go on to number 2.  And here’s where I’m looking for cycles. Cycles are the oscillations of the market (higher high’s, higher lows). This is where I have my cycle indicator. Again it’s not a proprietary indicator. I share it every week with people, for free, and teach them how to use it. So basically, I’m looking for a cycle high to come in at the same time we hit a resistance level. And number 3, I look at the energy of momentum. I look for momentum to start weakening because resistance will be broken as long as the market is strong. So, you have to have a resistance level, some sort of resistance. And then the timing (when is the time for the market to turn around). And number 3, when the market is weak pushing into that resistance. When you get the confluence of those 3 things, then boom, I just take my profits.

Cam Hawkins: 

What’s your favourite momentum indicator?

Barry Burns:

I use MACD, but I modify it. I change the inputs and then there are certain patterns that I trade on it. In the same with my cycle indicator, just like there are price patterns on bars. There’s candlestick patterns, head and shoulders, wedges etc. Well, indicators have patterns too. There are certain patterns that I trade on momentum and certain patterns that I trade on cycle.

Cam Hawkins: 

Before we wrap up what’s the best way for traders to get hold of you?

Barry Burns:

They can email me at barry@topdogtrading.com. Of course my website is topdogtrading.com. Also, if you go there that’s my blog. My blog is on the first page. There’s a lot of great free articles, free videos, podcasts. In addition on the right hand column I have a 5 day course that I give away and it’s 5 videos where I include a lot of the information I’m talked about here, but it’s more detailed and visual of course. I also wrote a book recently, it came out about 9 months ago and it’s part of the Dummies series and it’s called Trend Trading for Dummies.

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HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS HAVE MANY INHERENT LIMITATIONS, SOME OF WHICH ARE DESCRIBED BELOW. NO REPRESENTATION IS BEING MADE THAT ANY ACCOUNT WILL OR IS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE PROFITS OR LOSSES SIMILAR TO THOSE SHOWN. IN FACT, THERE ARE FREQUENTLY SHARP DIFFERENCES BETWEEN HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS AND THE ACTUAL RESULTS SUBSEQUENTLY ACHIEVED BY ANY PARTICULAR TRADING PROGRAM.

ONE OF THE LIMITATIONS OF HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS IS THAT THEY ARE GENERALLY PREPARED WITH THE BENEFIT OF HINDSIGHT. IN ADDITION, HYPOTHETICAL TRADING DOES NOT INVOLVE FINANCIAL RISK, AND NO HYPOTHETICAL TRADING RECORD CAN COMPLETELY ACCOUNT FOR THE IMPACT OF FINANCIAL RISK IN ACTUAL TRADING. FOR EXAMPLE, THE ABILITY TO WITHSTAND LOSSES, OR TO ADHERE TO A PARTICULAR TRADING PROGRAM IN SPITE OF TRADING LOSSES, ARE MATERIAL POINTS WHICH CAN ALSO ADVERSELY AFFECT ACTUAL TRADING RESULTS. THERE ARE NUMEROUS OTHER FACTORS RELATED TO THE MARKETS IN GENERAL, OR TO THE IMPLEMENTATION OF ANY SPECIFIC TRADING PROGRAM, WHICH CANNOT BE FULLY ACCOUNTED FOR IN THE PREPARATION OF HYPOTHETICAL PERFORMANCE RESULTS AND ALL OF WHICH CAN ADVERSELY AFFECT ACTUAL TRADING RESULTS.

At all times any and all information on, or product purchased from, this website, is for educational purposes only and is under no circumstance intended to provide financial advice. No guarantee is represented from any statements about profits or income, whether express or implied. As no trading system is guaranteed, your actual trading may result in losses. You will at all times accept the full responsibilities for all of your actions, including, but not limited to, trades, profit or loss. You agree to hold 52traders.com, Ziba Online Limited, the site's legal owners, AT and any authorized distributors of this information at all times harmless in any and all ways. By using our product(s) this constitutes your acceptance of our user agreement.

You agree by using this site, and related sites of ours and any of our material content you may receive either from such site or in any other form and that, accepting our terms and conditions of purchase that you agree that you, and you alone, must ensure that the use of any of the materials purchased from our site in any manner or form at all, is in compliance with your national, local, federal, state or county laws.

CFTC - U.S. Government Required Disclaimer:

Forex, futures and options trading have large potential rewards, but also large potential risk. You must be aware of the risks and be willing to accept them in order to invest in the futures and options markets. Don't trade with money you can't afford to lose. Our website, product contents, and materials are neither a solicitation nor an offer to Buy/Sell futures or options. No representation is being made that any account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those discussed on our website or in any materials. The past performance of any trading system or methodology is not necessarily indicative of future results. Substantial risk is involved. Forex trading has large potential rewards, but also large potential risk. You must be aware of the risks and be willing to accept them in order to invest in the Forex markets.

Don't trade with money you can't afford to lose. Nothing in our course or any materials or website(s) shall be deemed a solicitation or an offer to Buy/sell futures and/or options. No representation is being made that any account will or is likely to achieve profits or losses similar to those discussed on our site. Also, the past performance of any trading methodology is not necessarily indicative of futures results. Trading involves high risks and you can lose a lot of money.

CFTC RULE 4.41 – HYPOTHETICAL OR SIMULATED PERFORMANCE RESULTS HAVE CERTAIN LIMITATIONS. UNLIKE AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE RECORD, SIMULATED RESULTS DO NOT REPRESENT ACTUAL TRADING. ALSO, SINCE THE TRADES HAVE NOT BEEN EXECUTED, THE RESULTS MAY HAVE UNDER-OR-OVER COMPENSATED FOR THE IMPACT, IF ANY, OF CERTAIN MARKET FACTORS, SUCH AS LACK OF LIQUIDITY. SIMULATED TRADING PROGRAMS IN GENERAL ARE ALSO SUBJECT TO THE FACT THAT THEY ARE DESIGNED WITH THE BENEFIT OF HINDSIGHT. NO REPRESENTATION IS BEING MADE THAT ANY ACCOUNT WILL OR IS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE PROFIT OR LOSSES SIMILAR TO THOSE SHOWN.